Driving Standard Driver Training Services

DL25 DRIVING TEST REPORT

Driving Test report form

DVSA DRIVING EXAMINER ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Driving Examiner marking system (DL25)

Our Chief Instructor Bill Harkess is a former driving examiner, he has a comprehensive understanding of the DVSA examiners marking form.

Feel free to contact me should you require a simplified analysis of what would have caused the DVSA examiner to record a particular fault. 


We have provided the driving test marking system and some common assessment criteria. Hopefully this will provide you with a better understanding of what the examiner is looking for and the common errors that can occur on test.

Hopefully this will assist you with how the driving test is marked, and why the examiner may fail you on a particular point.

1a Eyesight Test

 Before you can start the driving test you must demonstrate that your eyesight is good enough to be able to drive safely.

You do this by reading a clean number plate of the old style from a minimum distance of 20.5 metres (approximately 67 feet or 5 car lengths). If reading a new style number plate (these letters are narrower) you must be able to read it from a minimum distance of 20 metres (approximately 66 feet).

If you have difficulty with spoken English you are permitted to write down what you see.

If you need to wear glasses or contact lenses to achieve this, you will be required to wear them throughout the test and whenever you drive normally.

If you cannot read the number plate the examiner will ask you to read a second number plate and if necessary take you a little closer to just over the required distance.

If you still have a problem the examiner will then measure the exact distance and check your ability to read a third number plate. If you cannot read this third plate correctly you will fail your driving test and the test will go no further.

Driving fault recorded
1a Eyesight:

  • Unable to read a number plate at 67 feet or 20.5 metres (or if new style number plate 66 feet or 20 metres) which is about five car lengths. This is a serious fault resulting in the termination of the test.

 11 Precautions before starting the engine

 Before you start the engine to move away you should

  • Undertake certain safety checks
  • Ensure that you can easily and comfortably reach and operate all the main controls of the car
  • Check that you can take clear observations to the front of the car through the windscreen and to the rear of the car via the mirrors.

What the examiner is looking for

Before starting your engine the examiner is checking to see if you have:

  1. Noted whether all the doors are closed and particularly whether you have properly closed your door
  2. Checked that you can safely operate all the main controls of the car (i.e. the steering wheel and each of the foot controls)
  3. Checked your mirrors to make sure they are properly adjusted
  4. Fastened your seatbelt and that it is not twisted
  5. Checked the handbrake to see if it is on
  6. Checked the gear lever to see if it is in neutral or if driving an automatic to see if the gear lever is in park (P) or neutral (N) position.

Driving faults recorded
11 Precautions:

  • Jumping forward while attempting to start the engine with the car in gear.
  • Rolling backwards or forwards while attempting to start the engine due to the handbrake not being on.
  • Adjusting the mirrors or the seating position while moving.
  • Preparing to move away with a door not properly shut.
  • Preparing to move away with a twisted seatbelt.

12 Proper use of the main controls of the car

Throughout the test the examiner will be noting the way you use the main controls of the car. Certain control faults are not recorded under this report heading because they relate to a specific manoeuvre such as the turn in the road.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is checking that you use the main controls:

Driving faults recorded
12 Control

  • Accelerator/Clutch
  • Gears
  • Footbrake
  • Hand/parking brake
  • Steering

Accelerator and clutch
What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is looking for you to:

  1. Control and balance the accelerator and clutch together to pull away smoothly or to maintain a slow speed in either forward or reverse gear, or to change gear
  2. Use the accelerator smoothly when accelerating and avoid surging
  3. Depress the clutch just before stopping the car.

When using an automatic car you must use the accelerator smoothly

  1. To avoid surging either forwards or backwards
  2. To control gear changes up the gearbox.

Driving faults recorded
12 Control
Accelerator:

  • Excessive pressure causing wheel spin.
  • Erratic pressure causing surging.
  • Not removing pressure while changing gear.
  • Applying pressure too soon after changing gear.

Clutch:

  • Jerky control.
  • Lack of control.
  • Releases too quickly.
  • Riding the pedal.
  • Not pressing fully to the floor.
  • Not used when stopping.

Gears
What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is looking for you to:

  1. Change gear in good time for any hazard
  2. Select the correct gear for the road conditions and the speed you are travelling at.

If driving an automatic and travelling down a steep hill the examiner will expect you to select a low gear.

Driving faults recorded 
12 Control
Gears:

  • Incorrect gear selection.
  • Coasting in neutral.
  • Reluctant to select higher gears.
  • Labours the engine.
  • Does not match gear with road speed.
  • Excessive speed in gear.
  • Unnecessary gear changes.
  • Used to reduce speed instead of brakes.
  • Selected too soon for hazards.
  • Selected too late for hazards.

Footbrake
What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is looking for you to:

  1. Brake smoothly and in good time
  2. Brake lightly in most situations
  3. Ease off the brake to a smooth stop or when you have reached the required speed.

When driving an automatic car the examiner is checking that you put your right foot on the footbrake before selecting Drive.

Driving faults recorded
12 Control

Footbrake:

  • Not used when required.
  • Late use on approach to hazards.
  • Harsh use by pressing too fiercely.

Hand/parking brake

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is looking for you to:

  1. Apply and release the handbrake properly
  2. Apply the handbrake when securing the car after stopping
  3. Apply the handbrake on a gradient to prevent rolling forward/backwards after stopping.

When driving an automatic the parking brake should only be applied after stopping and selecting Park.

Driving faults recorded
12 Control

Handbrake/parking brake:

  • Not applying when necessary
  • Not releasing properly.
  • Moving away with it partially on.
  • Not applying properly.
  • Applying on the move.
  • Rolling backwards or forward after stopping.

Steering

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is looking for you to

  1. Correctly hold the steering wheel at either ten-to-two or quarter-to-three whichever is the most comfortable for you
  2. Have smooth steering movements, using the pull push method
  3. Turn the steering wheel sufficiently and at the correct time when negotiating bends, corners and junctions.

Driving faults recorded
12 Control
Steering:

  • Incorrect hand position on the wheel.
  • Losing control by crossing hands.
  • Allowing wheel to spin back after turning.
  • Retaining hand on the gear lever for too long.
  • Removes both hands from steering wheel.
  • Overshooting right turns.
  • Over steers on corners.
  • Under steers on corners.
  • Steering with the right arm on the window ledge.

Striking the kerb when stopping.

13 Moving Off

On the driving test you will be required to move away on the flat, from behind a stationary vehicle and where possible on an up hill gradient. If the latter is not possible the examiner may choose a road with a high camber on which to do the turn in the road exercise.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is looking for you to move off safely and under control by

  1. Using your mirrors correctly
  2. Observing all traffic and other road users before moving away
  3. Signalling when necessary
  4. Checking your blind spot(s) accordingly
  5. Showing good co-ordination of the accelerator, clutch, brake and steering
  6. Selecting the appropriate gear to move away.

Driving faults recorded
13 Move off

Safely:

  • No attempt to look around.
  • Lack of observation ahead and to the rear.
  • Moves away when unsafe.

Under control:

  • Stalls the engine.
  • Moving away at too high a speed.
  • Rolls back.

14 Using the Mirrors

 You need to use your mirrors effectively to keep up with what is happening behind you at all times throughout the test.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner will check to see that you use your mirrors in good time, in the most appropriate order and act accordingly before

  1. Opening any car door
  2. Moving away
  3. Signalling
  4. Changing direction (junctions-changing lanes- overtaking)
  5. Changing speed (either slowing down, stopping or speeding up).

The examiner will also check to see that you use your mirrors frequently. How frequently will depend upon the road and traffic conditions at the time.

Driving faults recorded
14 Use of Mirrors

Signalling:

  • Signals before using mirrors.
  • Looks and signals at the same time.
  • Does not take appropriate action after observing traffic in mirrors.
  • Signals regardless of following traffic situation.

Change direction:

  • Does not consult mirrors before turning left or right.
  • Does not consult mirrors before changing lanes.
  • Does not consult mirrors before or after overtaking.

Change speed:

  • Does not consult mirrors before increasing speed.
  • Does not consult mirrors before reducing speed.

Does not consult mirrors before stopping.

15 Giving appropriate signals

 The Highway Code states you should give signals to warn and inform other road users, including pedestrians, of your intended actions. The main signals you are likely to use on the test are direction indicator signals.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner will expect you to give clear signals

  1. In plenty of time, having checked it is not misleading to signal at that time
  2. If necessary, before changing course or direction, pulling up or moving off
  3. Always on the approach to a junction when not going straight ahead unless on a road with multiple lanes where your lane is clearly marked as only going in one particular direction.

The examiner will also expect you to cancel the signal once it has served its purpose.

Driving faults recorded
15 Signals

Necessary:

  • Omits signals when they could benefit other road users.

Correctly:

  • Gives signals in the wrong direction.
  • Gives misleading signals.
  • Does not cancel signals after completion of manoeuvre.
  • Using any signal not in the Highway Code.

Timed:

  • Gives signal too early.
  • Gives signal too late.
  • Signals for too short a period of time.
  • Signals for too long a period of time.

16 Adequate clearance

When passing stationary vehicles or other obstructions it is important that you keep a certain distance away.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is checking that you do not get too close to the rear, the side or the front of a stationary vehicle or object as you pass it. You need to give at least a metre clearance if at all possible.

Driving faults recorded
16 Clearance/obstructions:

  • Drives too close to the rear of stationary vehicles before pulling out.
  • Drives too close to the side of stationary vehicles while driving past.
  • Cuts back to the left too soon after passing stationary vehicles.

17 Response to signs and signals

 Before your test starts your examiner will ask you to follow the road ahead unless directed otherwise by road markings or traffic signs. You will also be required to obey traffic light signals and those given by traffic controllers. Finally, you will also be required to respond in a safe and appropriate manner to signals given by other road users.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner will expect you to recognise, understand and act where necessary and in good time upon all

  1. Traffic signs
  2. Road markings
  3. Traffic signals
  4. Signals by traffic controllers
  5. Signals by other road users

Driving faults recorded
17 Response

  • Traffic signs
  • Road Markings
  • Traffic Lights
  • Traffic Controllers
  • Other Road Users

Traffic signs

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner will expect you to

  1. Obey traffic signs giving orders and
  2. Act appropriately towards other signs giving warnings, directions and other information.

Driving faults recorded
17 Response

Traffic signs:

  • Disregards speed limit signs.
  • Does not obey mandatory signs.
  • Ignores warning signs.
  • Ignores prohibiting signs.
  • Ignores priority signs.

Road markings

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner will expect you to act in accordance with:

  1. Lines and lane markings on the road
  2. Stop and give way lines at junctions and pedestrian crossings
  3. Box junctions
  4. Bus, tram and cycle lanes
  5. Traffic calming road markings
  6. Parking and waiting restriction road markings.

Driving faults recorded
17 Response
Road markings:

  • Does not act in accordance with lane direction arrows.
  • Crosses or straddles double white lines.
  • Drives in bus lanes at prohibited times.
  • Parks on double yellow lines.
  • Disregards box junction markings.
  • Stops on worded markings such as “Keep Clear”.
  • Parks on zigzag lines.

Traffic lights

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner will expect you to stop at traffic lights before the white line when

  1. The traffic lights are on red or
  2. When it is safe to do so on amber.

The examiner will expect you to proceed when the lights change to green provided it is safe to do so.

Driving faults recorded
17 Response
Traffic lights:

  • Attempts to drive through a red light.
  • Does not stop on amber when it was safe to do so.
  • Drives away on red and amber.
  • Proceeds on green light when unsafe to do so.

Traffic controllers

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner will expect you to obey all signals made by authorised traffic controllers such as

  1. Police officers
  2. School crossing patrol and
  3. Traffic wardens.

Driving faults recorded
17 Response
Traffic controllers:

  • Disregards signals given by police or a traffic warden.
  • Disregards signals given by a person in charge of road works with Stop/Go sign.
  • Disregards signal given by School Crossing Patrol.

Other road users

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner expects you to act upon the signals of other road users unless to do so is unsafe.

Driving faults recorded
17 Response to signals from other road users

  • Disregards clearly given signals by other drivers.

18 Use of speed

Driving no faster than the speed limit permits is the minimum you should consider when on the driving test.

Always travel at a speed that enables you to stop within the distance you can see to be clear ahead and are certain would remain clear in the time it would take you to stop.

Remember that weather conditions can significantly affect what this stopping distance would need to be.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is assessing your ability to

  1. Approach junctions and hazards at the correct speed
  2. Use speed to maintain a safe gap between you and other vehicles
  3. Always drive at a speed sufficient to stop well within in the distance you can see to be clear.

Driving faults recorded
18 Use of speed:

  • Drives in excess of the speed limit.
  • Drives at a speed, which is too fast for the road, traffic or weather conditions.
  • Drives too fast on the approach to certain hazards.
  • Drives too fast on the approach to junctions.

19 Following at a safe distance

Not following other vehicles at a safe distance is one of the common reasons for accidents, particularly rear end shunts. This is why this particular aspect of driving is individually itemised on the Driving Test Report.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is checking that you

  1. Keep a safe distance between you and the vehicle in front in slow moving heavy traffic - a minimum of a cars length for every 10 miles per hour you are travelling (i.e. approximately your thinking distance)
  2. Keep a good distance between you and larger vehicles so that you get a clear view of the road ahead in normal driving conditions
  3. Use the 2 second rule to determine your following distance in normal driving
  4. Leave at least double the distances in point 3 in poor driving conditions
  5. Leave enough room in waiting traffic so that if the vehicle in front breaks down you can still manoeuvre out (make sure you can see tyres and tarmac).

Driving faults recorded
19 Following distance:

  • Drives too close to vehicles ahead.
  • Does not attempt the two-second rule.
  • Drives closer than thinking distance in heavy traffic.
  • Stops too close to vehicles ahead in traffic queues.

20 Making progress

Driving well below the speed limit can be as dangerous as driving above it. Particularly if this causes frustration amongst other road users who may feel the need to overtake you when it is unsafe to do so.

Similarly being hesitant at junctions or when approaching hazards or when other road users are clearly giving way can result in dangers as you unexpectedly stop or unnecessarily slow down.

What your examiner is looking for

The examiner is expecting you to

  1. Drive up to the speed limit if road, weather and traffic conditions permit or at a realistic speed if not
  2. Approach hazards at a safe controlled speed without being over cautious or interfering with the progress of other traffic
  3. Emerge from junctions without stopping at give way lines if it is safe to do so or emerge at the first safe opportunity to proceed.

Driving faults recorded
20 Progress

Appropriate speed:

  • Crawls along at slow speeds on clear roads.
  • Makes no attempt to achieve maximum speeds for the road when safe to do so.
  • Reduces speed excessively when the conditions do not merit doing so.
  • Makes slow progress through the gears in normal driving.

Undue hesitancy:

  • Makes unnecessary stops at junctions and other hazards.
  • Waits unnecessarily when it is safe to proceed at junctions.
  • Waits for green light at pedestrian crossings when clear on flashing amber.
  • Waits for other drivers, who are clearly giving way.

21 Junctions

The test will incorporate all the usual types of junction including roundabouts.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is checking that you

  1. Use the MSM routine in good time when approaching all junctions and roundabouts
  2. Position correctly for your intended direction of travel
  3. Adjust your speed so that you can negotiate the junction safely and select the appropriate gear before you begin to turn or emerge
  4. Stop when necessary in a safe and appropriate position and apply the handbrake if a pause becomes a wait or if on a steep gradient
  5. Use the correct lane if the road has road markings
  6. Give way to pedestrians and cyclists where necessary
  7. Take effective observations on approach to the junction and before emerging from the junction or before entering the new road
  8. Creep and peep when emerging if your view of the road is restricted
  9. Maintain an appropriate path into and out of the junction being negotiated keeping to your side of the road where possible
  10. Make progress by emerging without stopping whenever it is safe and legal to do so.

Driving faults recorded
21 Junctions

Approach speed:

  • Approaches at too high a speed.
  • Approaches at too slow a speed.

Observation:

  • Only looks in one direction at junctions before emerging.
  • Does not creep forward when necessary to take observations.
  • Looks in both directions after emerging.
  • Does not look in the direction of travel while emerging.
  • Takes no observation whatsoever at unmarked crossroads.
  • Emerges when traffic is too close or too fast.
  • Emerges into the path of approaching traffic.

The test will incorporate all the usual types of junction including roundabouts.

Driving faults recorded
21 Junctions

Turning right:

  • Positions over centre lines.
  • Positions left of centre in narrow roads.
  • Does not position near enough to centre lines.
  • Does not move into protected centre lane when available.
  • Does not use right hand lane, when one is available.
  • Does not proceed far enough forward when giving way to oncoming traffic.
  • Does not move out to centre of the side road when turning right at traffic lights.
  • Sits behind stop line at green light, with room to move forwards.

Turning left:

  • Too far from left hand kerb on the approach.
  • Swings out to the right on the approach.
  • Too close to the kerb on approach.
  • Drives over the kerb with rear nearside wheel.

Cutting corners:

  • Cuts across onto the wrong side of side road when turning right into a side road.

22 Overtaking, meeting and crossing other traffic

 While on the test you may need to overtake other road users, deal with oncoming traffic when the road narrows or cross the path of oncoming traffic streams. If these situations occur you need to deal with them in a safe and appropriate manner.

What the examiner is looking for

When overtaking, meeting or crossing other traffic the examiner is checking that you

  1. Use the MSM routine on approach
  2. Know when to hold back and when to proceed
  3. Complete the manoeuvre safely and with confidence.

Driving faults recorded
22 Judgement

  • Overtaking
  • Meeting
  • Crossing

Overtaking

What the examiner is looking for

When overtaking the examiner is checking that you

  1. Take advantage of any safe opportunities to overtake slower moving vehicles
  2. Use the MSM routine in good time
  3. Choose a safe location where road markings or signs do not prohibit overtaking or where other road features would make it unsafe
  4. Do not commence the manoeuvre until you can see there is sufficient clear road ahead, taking into account the speed of any oncoming vehicles
  5. Accelerate briskly when overtaking to avoid taking too long to complete the manoeuvre safely
  6. Give sufficient clearance to the vehicle being overtaken as you pass and move back into your lane
  7. Give cyclists, motorcyclists and horses at least the same distance as you would a car.

Driving faults recorded
22 Judgement

Overtaking:

  • Attempts to overtake in an unsafe location.
  • Attempts to overtake when traffic conditions make it unsafe to do so.
  • Takes too long a time and distance to carry out manoeuvre.
  • Does not give enough clearance to other vehicles or road users.
  • Cuts back in too soon after overtaking
  • Follows the overtaking vehicle in front without making sure it is clear first.

Meeting

What the examiner is looking for

When meeting traffic ahead where the road narrows the examiner is checking that you

  1. Use the MSM routine in good time
  2. Adjust your approach speed to avoid the need to stop when it is safe to proceed
  3. Know when to hold back and when to proceed
  4. Position the car so that oncoming traffic can proceed safely if you need to stop
  5. Give way to oncoming traffic when signs or road markings give them priority
  6. Reduce speed and position the car appropriately to go through any narrow gaps.

Driving faults recorded
22 Judgement
Meeting:

  • Causes oncoming traffic to slow down or stop.
  • Drives on towards other vehicles when other vehicles have priority.

Crossing

What the examiner is looking for

When you cross the path of any oncoming traffic the examiner is checking that you

  1. Use the MSM routine when approaching to cross the path of any vehicles
  2. Adjust your speed on approach to avoid the need to stop, when safe to do so, by timing your arrival to coincide with any suitable gaps in the oncoming traffic
  3. Know when to hold back and when to proceed
  4. Position the car so that oncoming traffic can proceed safely, if you need to stop
  5. Accelerate briskly when crossing to avoid taking too long to complete the manoeuvre safely.

Driving faults recorded
22 Judgement
Crossing:

  • Inconveniences oncoming road users by cutting across in front of them.

23 Road positioning and lane discipline

 As you drive along you need to adjust the position of you car in relation to the kerb and the centre of the road or within the lines of a marked lane. When faced with multiple lanes or wide roads you need to determine which lane to take or how best to position the car respectively.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is checking to see that you are positioning the car appropriately within the width of the road as you are driving along. In particular the examiner is checking to see that you

  1. Keep your car in the centre of the left hand side of the road unless the road is particularly wide in which case keep to the left about a metre from the kerb
  2. Adjust your position as necessary so that you can safely deal with hazards ahead and behind
  3. Avoid moving in and out between parked cars unnecessarily
  4. Position yourself in the correct lane early and avoid unnecessary lane changes
  5. Keep to the middle of any lane markings if possible
  6. Only use the right hand lane or lanes on a dual carriageway for overtaking or turning right unless road markings or signs indicate otherwise.

Driving faults recorded
23 Positioning

Normal driving:

  • Drives too close to the left hand kerb.
  • Drives too far out towards the middle of the road
  • Unnecessarily moves in and out between parked cars.

Lane discipline:

  • Chooses incorrect lane when proceeding ahead at roundabouts or traffic lights.
  • Does not keep to the selected lane where the roundabout can support two lanes of traffic.
  • Uses overtaking lanes on dual carriageways for normal driving 
  • Straddles lane markings.
  • Wanders back and forwards from one lane to the other.

24 Pedestrian crossings

There are several types of pedestrian crossings that you may encounter on the test.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is checking that you

  1. Use the MSM routine in good time on approach
  2. Reduce your speed on approach if people are waiting to cross and you think the lights are about to change to red or that someone may step on to the road or if your view of the crossing is restricted
  3. Do not beckon anyone to cross
  4. Slow down and give way to pedestrians already crossing
  5. Slow down and stop if the lights change to amber and then red
  6. Slow down and stop if pedestrians are about to cross at a zebra crossing
  7. Stop behind the designated stop/give way line
  8. Do not straddle the crossing area when in queues of traffic and keep behind the stop/give way line until it is safe to proceed and sufficient space is available to clear the crossing area
  9. Do not move off until the lights turn to green and it is safe to do so. Unless on a pelican crossing in which case you can proceed on flashing amber if it is safe to do so
  10. Do not wait unnecessarily when the amber light at a pelican crossing is flashing and no one else intends to cross in front of you
  11. Are courteous and patient.

Driving faults recorded
24 Pedestrian crossings:

  • Does not reduce speed on the approach when vision is restricted.
  • Approaches at too high a speed with pedestrians on crossing.
  • Overtaking on zigzag lines on approach.
  • Not giving precedence to pedestrians on a crossing.
  • Not stopping at give way or stop lines when necessary.
  • Not acting in accordance with the traffic lights controlling the crossing.
  • Harassing pedestrians.
  • Waving pedestrians over a crossing.
  • Moving away before pedestrians have crossed over in front of the car.
  • Attempting to proceed when unsafe to do so.
  • Stopping on the actual crossing.

25 Pulling up at the side of the road

At various points on the test the examiner will ask you to pull up in a safe, legal and convenient place on the left. You will be required to do this just before undertaking any of the standard test manoeuvres.

What the examiner is looking for

Once the examiner has asked you to pull up on the left he or she will be looking for you to

  1. Use the MSM routine correctly
  2. Select a safe, legal and convenient place to pull up
  3. Steer towards the kerb without striking it or being too wide from the kerb as you use the brake progressively to slow the car down
  4. Use the clutch just as the car stops
  5. Secure the car when stationary.

Driving faults recorded
25 Position/normal stops:

  • Stopping in an unsafe or inconvenient location.
  • Blocking an entrance or driveway when stopping.
  • Causing an obstruction to other road users.
  • Stopping too far away from the pavement.
  • Stopping with one or more wheels on the pavement.

26 Awareness and planning

The laws of physics make it impossible for a car to stop dead. Similarly it is impossible for you to instantly react and apply the brakes. (See braking/thinking distances in the Highway Code). This is why you need to anticipate what might happen next and plan a course of action rather than wait until it actually happens. Although the examiner is not requiring you to do this as well as an experienced driver he or she will expect you to anticipate and act upon the more common hazards that occur.

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is checking that you

  1. Take every opportunity to look, see and act on what's happening well ahead and around you
  2. Particularly recognise the potential hazards that vulnerable road users can present and act accordingly
  3. Use the MSM routine on approach to any potential hazards
  4. Act upon any potential hazards by adjusting speed or position or both
  5. Slow down and stop where it becomes necessary to avoid dangers.

Driving faults recorded
26 Awareness and planning:

  • Not anticipating that pedestrians are about to cross the road at any time.
  • Not giving way to pedestrians at junctions or pedestrian crossings.
  • Not anticipating that cyclists may be passing on the left or right.
  • Not anticipating that cyclists are about to make a change of direction.
  • Not anticipating or showing awareness of direction signals given by other drivers.
  • Not anticipating or showing awareness of vehicles displaying hazard flashers.
  • Not anticipating or showing awareness of vehicles reversing lights.
  • Not anticipating or showing awareness of brake lights on other vehicles.
  • Not anticipating the actions of other drivers changing speed or direction.

27 Appropriate use of ancillary controls

 The ancillary controls are:

  1. Lights
  2. Indicators
  3. Windscreen wipers
  4. De-misters
  5. Heated rear windscreen
  6. Heater/air conditioning
  7. Horn
  8. Hazard warning lights

What the examiner is looking for

The examiner is looking for you to know when and how to use any of the ancillary controls. You will also need to know the meaning of the various warning lights on the dashboard and act accordingly should any be activated. The most common ones being:

  1. Indicator
  2. Main beam
  3. Handbrake
  4. Seatbelt
  5. Airbag
  6. Brake
  7. Oil

Driving faults recorded
27 Ancillary controls:

  • Not operating the front or rear windscreen wipers or washers when necessary.
  • Not operating the side or headlamp controls when necessary.
  • Not operating the horn when necessary.
  • Not operating the heated rear screen control when necessary.
  • Not operating the demister controls when necessary.
  • Not operating the hazard warning lights when necessary.

28 Eco Safe Driving

Eco-safe driving is a style of driving that will help to reduce damage to our planet and the air we breathe whilst improving road safety. Transport currently accounts for 20% of all air pollution emissions in the world. Eco-safe driving is not about driving at lower speeds (although this would undoubtedly help to reduce fuel consumption and accidents) it is more about avoiding senseless wastage of fuel through unnecessary acceleration or braking, inefficient use of the gears and speeding (i.e. exceeding permitted limits or driving at speeds unsafe for the prevailing conditions). The skills required for hazard perception, defensive driving and progressive driving play a big part in Eco-safe driving as they will help you to avoid inefficient use of the accelerator, brake and gears through better awareness, anticipation and planning.

What the examiner is looking for

Control

  1. Minimisation of harsh or rapid acceleration. Whenever it is safe to do so, gradually increase speed by gently depressing the accelerator.
  2. Engagement of higher gears as soon as possible without labouring the engine. Avoid engaging unnecessary intermediate gear changes so that you can more quickly engage higher gears or delay engaging lower gears. Modern cars are designed to deliver power even when engine revs are quite low and provided you haven’t lost momentum as you slow down you will be surprised how late you can leave a downward gear change without risking an engine stall.

Planning

  1. Minimisation of harsh braking or unnecessary stopping. Look well ahead and if you see that you will need to reduce speed, do it gradually using engine braking rather than applying the brake at the last minute. Gradually adjust your speed to time your arrival at meet situations or when turning right such that you can potentially maintain progress and avoid having to stop. Similarly, you can do this when emerging from a give way junction provided you have a good view of the road you intend to emerge into as you approach the junction.
  2. Look well ahead to see what is happening, to ensure that any acceleration now will not be wasted a little later on because you have to brake. Let gravity aid you so that if you are going down hill you may find you can fully release pressure on the accelerator and still maintain a safe speed.

Driving faults recorded
28 Eco Safe Driving

The examiner will record any of the faults below but they will not take into account when deciding whether or not you should pass. However, the examiner will advise you of these faults and offer you a copy of the Eco-safe driving leaflet.

Control

  • Rev-up the engine whilst waiting to move off.
  • Use excessive acceleration to move off at speed as if competing in a race.
  • Peak the revs in each gear to obtain maximum acceleration.
  • Remain in lower gear unnecessarrily
  • Change down into lower gear unnecessarrily

Planning

  • Tailgate vehicles resulting in continual harsh braking and acceleration.
  • Wait until the last minute to react to hazards including junctions ahead by braking harshly.
  • Rush to overtake at each and every opportunity even on congested roads where little benefit will be gained.
  • Miss good opportunities to use selective gear changing.
  • Miss good opportunities to use slight speed adjustments to maintain progress rather than having to stop.

 

 

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